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 Library of Congress, LOC – General News 01

  • Free to Use and Reuse: Classic Children’s Page Turners
    This is a guest post by Sasha Dowdy, program specialist in the Library’s Young Readers Center. “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz,” by L. Frank Baum with illustrations by W.W. Denslow. Ever since I was in elementary school, books have been bridge-builders for me. I am not a native English-speaker—my first language is Russian, and my second is Japanese—so as a child, it was a challenge sometimes to connect with the language in my classroom. Enter “The Wizard of Oz” in the hands of my Canadian tutor. I knew the general story, but it came alive when I started slowly piecing the language puzzle together into portraits of Dorothy and her friends. Not only did I want to keep reading after our weekly two hours were up—I ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Library of Congress BlogPublished on Friday, August 18, 2017
  • National Book Festival Posters: Download Your Favorites!
    This year’s National Book Festival poster, designed by Roz Chast. The National Book Festival began in 2001 as a joint project of former first lady Laura Bush and the Library of Congress. A career librarian and a native of Texas, Bush proposed a national literacy event building on the success of the Texas Book Festival. Her idea took off: the National Book Festival has taken place every year since 2001 in Washington, D.C., attracting more than a million visitors in total. This year’s festival will take place on September 2 at the Washington Convention Center. One much-loved feature of the festival is the unique poster commissioned for each. Texas artist Lu Ann Barrow painted a folklore-style poster art for the first festival. Designed with children ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Library of Congress BlogPublished on Thursday, August 17, 2017
  • National Tell-a-Joke Day: Listen to the Earliest Recording of One!
    This is a guest post by American Folklife Center archivist Kelly Revak. An expanded version appeared in “Folklife Today,” the center’s blog. Anthropologist Jesse Walter Fewkes, 1905. Photograph by Harris and Ewing. Did you know that today is National Tell-a-Joke-Day? Neither did I, until one of my colleagues informed me. But it is timely, because I believe I have found the earliest audio recording of a joke being told. Read on for the full story and listen to the recording. But be forewarned: it’s a political joke! When I joined the Library’s American Folklife Center as an archivist, one of my first tasks was to catalog ethnographic recordings of Passamaquoddy Indian tradition bearers made in 1890 by Harvard anthropologist Jesse Walter Fewkes (1850–1930). He ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Library of Congress BlogPublished on Wednesday, August 16, 2017
  • World War I: Exhibition Specialists to Host Live Web Talks
    This is a guest post by Kathleen McGuigan, an educational resources specialist in the Educational Outreach Program. “Lest Liberty Perish,” by printmaker Joseph Pennell, encouraged purchase of bonds to support U.S. efforts in World War I. Pennell’s wartime work will be the subject of a November 28 Library of Congress webinar. Hundreds of visitors to the Library over the past few months have taken a deep dive into the Library’s World War I resources by attending a gallery talk—a presentation by a Library specialist about the exhibition “Echoes of the Great War: American Experiences of World War I,” commemorating the 100th anniversary of U.S. entry into the war. Now you can participate in a gallery talk long distance through our new five-part webinar series. We ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Library of Congress BlogPublished on Tuesday, August 15, 2017
  • Latest News: CORRECTION: Library Seeks Volunteer Docents
    The Library of Congress is recruiting the 2017 class of volunteer docents to lead tours of the world’s largest library. Click here for more information. (Corrected Link) ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Latest NewsPublished on Monday, August 14, 2017
  • Rare Book of the Month: A Man Driven by “Amazing Grace”
    This is a guest post by digital library specialist Elizabeth Gettins. John Newton, composer of “Amazing Grace,” published in “Olney Hymns” in 1779. He started as a sailor for the Atlantic slave trade but later denounced that life and became a much-loved religious figure. It is always interesting to examine how a particular book came to publication with a look toward the cast of characters involved as well as the influences of place. The rare book I am highlighting this month is “Olney Hymns,” written by an English clergyman by the name of John Newton in 1779 with the aid of his friend William Cowper. Within this title are 348 hymns—280 by Newton (1725–1807) and 68 by Cowper (1731–1800). Each man is quite interesting ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Library of Congress BlogPublished on Monday, August 14, 2017
  • Latest News: Library Seeks Volunteer Docents
    The Library of Congress is recruiting the 2017 class of volunteer docents to lead tours of the world’s largest library. Click here for more information. ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Latest NewsPublished on Friday, August 11, 2017
  • Pic of the Week: Bringing the Navy’s History to Life Through Photos
    Photo by Shawn Miller. Robert Hanshew, a photo curator for the U.S. Navy, visits the Library’s Prints and Photographs Division almost every Friday to research images related to naval history. Some of his discoveries from the Library’s collections are featured in a major outdoor public history exhibit that opened this summer. Titled “Behind These Walls,” the exhibit consists of nine-by-seven-foot panels mounted along the historical perimeter of the Washington, D.C., Navy Yard. The panels offer quick, easy lessons for passersby on uses of the Navy Yard since its establishment in 1799. The 1864 photo shown here depicts six marines holding bayonets at the Navy Yard. It belongs to a group of photographs from 1861 to 1865 that relate to the federal navy and its seaborne ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Library of Congress BlogPublished on Friday, August 11, 2017
  • World War I: Over There
    This is a guest post by Rachel Telford, archivist for the Veterans History Project. It was first published on “Folklife Today,” the blog of the American Folklife Center. Recently, the Veterans History Project launched “Over There,” part two of our companion site to the Library of Congress exhibit “Echoes of the Great War: American Experiences of World War I.” While part one explores the United States’ entry into the war, part two delves into the experiences of American servicemen overseas during the world’s first large-scale, industrialized war. Francis Edward Mahoney, circa 1918 Francis Edward Mahoney wrote to his mother regularly while he served in France. His wartime letters are full of details about his incoming mail and assurances that he is in good health but ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Library of Congress BlogPublished on Thursday, August 10, 2017

 Library of Congress, LOC – General News 02

  • Take your last summer trip
    Visit us online at www.loc.gov/shop       ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Library ShopPublished on Saturday, August 19, 2017
  • New Video: BeauSoleil Quartet Oral History
    Members of the BeauSoleil Quartet discussed their lives and musical careers. Click here to watch the video. ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – New WebcastsPublished on Friday, August 18, 2017
  • New Video: Cape Breton Fiddle, New Orleans Funk
    Burt Feintuch discusses how two seemingly very different places, Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia and New Orleans, Louisiana, turn out to have much in common. Click here to watch the video. ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – New WebcastsPublished on Friday, August 18, 2017
  • New Video: Tim Gunn on Disco Fashion
    Deputy Librarian of Congress Robert Newlen interviewed fashion icon and native-Washingtonian Tim Gunn about the history of fashion in the disco era and its impact on modern fashion. Click here to watch the video. ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – New WebcastsPublished on Friday, August 18, 2017
  • New Video: Brothers at Arms
    Larrie D. Ferreiro discussed his book, "Brothers at Arms: American Independence and the Men of France and Spain Who Saved It," in which he asserts that the American Revolution had little chance of being won by the American colonists, if it had not been for the assistance of French and Spanish soldiers, money and weapons. Click here to watch the video. ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – New WebcastsPublished on Friday, August 18, 2017
  • New Video: Rhythmic Imagination in African Music
    Renowned musicologist Kofi Agawu lectures on his most recent book, "The African Imagination in Music," with a focus on the chapter about rhythm. Click here to watch the video. ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – New WebcastsPublished on Friday, August 18, 2017
  • Patron Services: Aug 29 Webinar: Books Go to War: Armed Services Editions in World War II
    Please join us for our August topical webinar: Books Go to War: Armed Services Editions in World War II When the United States entered World War II in 1941, it opposed nations that had banned and burned books. In 1943, the Council on Books in Wartime, working with the War Department, began distributing pocket-size paperback volumes to soldiers in every theater of war. By 1947, approximately 123 million copies of some 1,300 titles in every genre had been printed and distributed as Armed Services Editions. The program rescued from obscurity such now-classic books as F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby (1925), while Betty Smith’s A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (1943) became a national favorite. These books laid the groundwork for broad popularity of mass market ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Patron ServicesPublished on Friday, August 18, 2017
  • Aug 29 Webinar: Books Go to War: Armed Services Editions in World War II
    Please join us for our August topical webinar: Books Go to War: Armed Services Editions in World War II When the United States entered World War II in 1941, it opposed nations that had banned and burned books. In 1943, the Council on Books in Wartime, working with the War Department, began distributing pocket-size paperback volumes to soldiers in every theater of war. By 1947, approximately 123 million copies of some 1,300 titles in every genre had been printed and distributed as Armed Services Editions. The program rescued from obscurity such now-classic books as F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby (1925), while Betty Smith’s A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (1943) became a national favorite. These books laid the groundwork for broad popularity of mass market ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Virtual Programs and ServicesPublished on Friday, August 18, 2017
  • New Video: Interview with Brett Dean
    Violist, composer and conductor Brett Dean discusses his experience playing on the Library of Congress' "Tuscan-Medici" viola by Stradivari (1690). Click here to watch the video. ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – New WebcastsPublished on Friday, August 18, 2017
  • New Video: Olinguito from A to Z
    Lulu Delacre talks to bilingual kindergartners from Oyster-Adams School in Washington, D.C. about her book, "Olinguito from A to Z." Click here to watch the video. ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – New WebcastsPublished on Friday, August 18, 2017

 Library of Congress, LOC – Events

  • Upcoming Events: September Film Series
    Six new and returning live acts take the stage at the Packard Campus Theater next month. Four evenings of silent film screenings with live musical accompaniment will also be featured during the month of September.  Click here for more information. Request ADA accommodations five business days in advance at (202) 707-6362 or ADA@loc.gov. ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Upcoming EventsPublished on Thursday, August 17, 2017
  • Upcoming Events: 2017-2018 Concert Season
    The Library of Congress kicks off its 2017-2018 concert season with a terrific pair of back-to-back concerts. Click here for more information. Request ADA accommodations five business days in advance at (202) 707-6362 or ADA@loc.gov. ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Upcoming EventsPublished on Thursday, August 17, 2017
  • Upcoming Events: 2017 National Student Poets
    The Library of Congress will host the appointment ceremony of the sixth class of the National Student Poets Program, honoring five outstanding youth poets from across the United States for their original work. Click here for more information. Request ADA accommodations five business days in advance at (202) 707-6362 or ADA@loc.gov. ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Upcoming EventsPublished on Tuesday, August 15, 2017
  • Upcoming Events: Library to Mark Constitution Day
    In commemoration of Constitution Day, the Law Library of Congress will host constitutional law and history professor Michael J. Klarman of Harvard Law School, who will discuss his book, “The Framers’ Coup: The Making of the United States Constitution.” Click here for more information. Request ADA accommodations five business days in advance at (202) 707-6362 or ADA@loc.gov. ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Upcoming EventsPublished on Friday, August 11, 2017
  • Upcoming Events: Poet Laureate Reading
    Tracy K. Smith, a Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and a professor at Princeton University, will give her inaugural reading as the 22nd Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry at the Library of Congress at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 13. Click here for more information. Request ADA accommodations five business days in advance at (202) 707-6362 or ADA@loc.gov. ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Upcoming EventsPublished on Thursday, August 10, 2017

 Library of Congress, LOC – Blogs 01

  • Pioneering Women in Congress
    The following is a guest blog post by Christina Miskey and Allison Bailund, Law Library metadata interns, University of Washington MLIS students, and women’s history buffs. Today is the 97th anniversary of the 19th amendment to the United States Constitution guaranteeing women the right to vote. In honor of this culmination of the women’s suffrage movement and the first major blockbuster superhero movie featuring women as both the star and director, we have gathered a list of some of the pioneering female superheroes in Congress, along with references to a few collections in the Library of Congress related to women’s history. An artist’s rambles in Washington – No. 3: the Senate lobby and the floor of the House / from sketches by a staff ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – In Custodia Legis BlogPublished on Friday, August 18, 2017
  • Browse Law.gov Content by Topic or Jurisdiction
    A few years ago, Andrew mentioned the possibility of adding a page where users could browse by jurisdiction among our different content types.  Our content types include In Custodia Legis, the Guide to Law Online, the Global Legal Monitor, Legal Reports, and other content materials such as research guides. We are adding more content in the coming months including the historical U.S. Reports, Statutes at Large, U.S. Code, U.S. Treaties, and the Code of Federal Regulations. In order to help find subjects or jurisdictions when the content type doesn’t matter, you can still use the facets on our search page or now use our newly created browse page. Screenshot of Topics & Jurisdictions page, http://www.loc.gov/law/find/topics.php. The first category on this page is “Topics.” We have ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – In Custodia Legis BlogPublished on Thursday, August 17, 2017
  • Solar Eclipse: A Moment of Awe, Wonder, and Belief
    The ravenous Hindu god Rahu Ketu before losing his head. Sculpture in the British Museum. Photo by Redtigerxyz, 2007 and shared in English Wikimedia with a Creative Commons license. According to Hindu mythology, there is an unseen “planet” out there in the form of the head of a serpent god, Rahu Ketu. This god wanted to gobble up the sun.  To prevent this Vishnu cut off his head. The head, Rahu, and the body, Ketu, became two entities out there circling the Earth (in Earth-centered astrology). These are the deities of  eclipses and comets.  Rahu is fixated on eating the sun and the moon, and will try to catch them and gobble them up. Fortunately he only succeeds once in a while. Since his head ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Folklife Today BlogPublished on Wednesday, August 16, 2017
  • Photo Blog #19: Potpourri
    Hello and thanks for checking out our latest mystery photo blog.  We’ve got some odd ones for you this time.  Please see below.  As always, “clicking” on any of the photos will enlarge them.  As they are solved, we will update this post accordingly.  Many thanks! 1.  Surely someone has seen this film.  It seems never noir.  Who are the actors and can anyone tell us the title? SOLVED:  “Deadline at Dawn” with Constance Worth from 1946.–Thanks, Camille! 2.  Might this be an actor or a vaudeville star?  If you know his name, please clue us in. 3.  Anyone know this songstress?   4.  These two ice skates are, so far, unknown to us.  And, yes, she does seem to be ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Now See Hear BlogPublished on Wednesday, August 16, 2017
  • Congress.gov Tip, Top, and New for August 2017
    I recently mentioned that we are doing releases for Congress.gov that are more frequent and smaller in scope.  Rather than posting highlights of just the new enhancements, I thought it would be good to share a little more from across Congress.gov including the featured search tip and the top 10 most-viewed bills. Search Tip Adrienne Keys drafts and regularly shares search tips (available via RSS or email).  The current featured tip is on Senate Communications Quick Search: A Senate Communications Quick Search option allows you to search according to the date – or range of dates – that executive communications (EC), presidential messages (PM), or petitions and memorials (POM) appeared in the Congressional Record. You can try this feature with a search for items that appeared in the ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – In Custodia Legis BlogPublished on Tuesday, August 15, 2017
  • “Would You Be Interested in Getting (Attorney General) William Wirt’s Head Back?” Rebecca Roberts Brings Us a Tale From the Congressional Cemetery
    This is a guest post by Rebecca Boggs Roberts. Rebecca is a program coordinator at Smithsonian Associates, writer, and the former program director for the Historic Congressional Cemetery. In 2003, an unidentified man called the Historic Congressional Cemetery in Washington, D.C. and asked the cemetery manager, “Would you be interested in getting William Wirt’s head back?” The answer, of course, was yes, but the mysterious caller hung up without providing more details. Hardly a household name now, William Wirt was prominent in his day.  Born into a relatively prosperous Maryland family in 1772, Wirt was orphaned as a boy. With the help of some generous patrons, Wirt received a classical education, read for and was admitted to the Virginia Bar. He led a distinguished legal career and eventually served ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – In Custodia Legis BlogPublished on Monday, August 14, 2017
  • Now Playing at the Packard Campus Theater (August 17-19, 2017)
    The following is a guest post by Jenny Paxson of the Packard Campus. Each Dawn I Die (Warner Bros., 1939) Thursday, August 17 (7:30 p.m.)Each Dawn I Die (Warner Bros., 1939) James Cagney stars as cocky reporter Frank Ross in this fast-paced crime drama directed by William Keighley. While investigating a crooked district attorney running for governor, Ross is framed for manslaughter and sent to prison where he befriends a famous gangster “Hood” Stacey (George Raft). The film also features George Bancroft as the no-nonsense prison warden, Victor Jory, Jane Bryan and Maxie Rosenbloom.  Each Dawn I Die was a box-office hit and remains a favorite among devotees of Warner Bros. gangster movies. Friday, August 18 (7:30 p.m.)Eli Cook – River of Blues: a Performance ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Now See Hear BlogPublished on Monday, August 14, 2017
  • Honored and Blessed: My Summer Spent with Arkansas Veterans
    The following is a guest post by Victoria Anderson, a summer intern in Sen. John Boozman’s (AR) Little Rock office. Victoria Anderson with Sen. John Boozman (AR). “I am so thankful he provides opportunities like this for college students.” History may seem like a row of dusty old books sitting on a shelf, something people pass over because it looks boring, but I want to remind everyone that it is not. History is living and breathing. It is the lives our parents and grandparents have lived and continue to live. The stories they have to share are priceless, and I am so thankful the Library of Congress Veterans History Project (VHP) realizes this. When I interviewed for this internship, I had to decide between interning ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Folklife Today BlogPublished on Monday, August 14, 2017
  • Kudzu, Invasive Species and the Law
    Last weekend I was pulling English ivy off the corner of my house where it had grown over from the neighbor’s yard, and I reflected on the large number of invasive plants I see growing all over the national capital area: kudzu, porcelain berry, water hyacinth, callery pear, and tree of heaven.  I wondered what the law has done to help with this “ecological plague”. Kudzu is a prime example of this problem; it’s also known as “the vine that ate the South” for its rapid-fire, ubiquitous spread across the southeastern United States.  Kudzu (Pueraria montana var. lobata) is a legume, originally from Japan. The Soil Conservation Service encouraged Southern farmers to plant it in the 1930s and 1940s as a cover crop to add ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – In Custodia Legis BlogPublished on Friday, August 11, 2017
  • Naming Laws in Germany
    In April 2017, the Association for the German Language (Gesellschaft für deutsche Sprache (GfdS)) published its annual list of the most popular baby names of the last year. The GfdS has been publishing this list since 1977. Since 2004, it has been included in the Statistical Yearbook of Germany by the German Statistical Office (Destatis), thereby making it the semi-official German list, as the German government does not publish its own list. In honor of the 70th anniversary of the GfdS, this year’s list included  70 names total instead of the usual ten names per gender. In addition, the GfdS also published a list of the Top-5 all-time favorite first names since the list started 40 years ago. The All-Time Top-5 for Girls: The All-Time Top-5 for ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – In Custodia Legis BlogPublished on Thursday, August 10, 2017

 Library of Congress, LOC – Blogs 02

  • Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers: 148 Years Ago: “Phenomena of a Total Eclipse,” The Evening Telegraph, August 4, 1869
    What did we know about the how’s and why’s of a total eclipse of the sun in 1869? Having experienced a total eclipse in North America just a few years prior in 1860, newspaper readers of 1869 were eager for information. The Evening Telegraph (Philadelphia, PA) presented that and more just before the August 7 event, providing a combination of science, story and conjecture to describe the phenomena, declaring “No approach to totality can give the slightest conception of the effect produced the instant that the last ray of light is extinguished.” On Monday, August 21, 2017 millions across America will make their own observations of this rare occurrence. Read more about it and follow us on Twitter @librarycongress #ChronAm #Eclipse2017! ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Chronicling America: Historic American NewspapersPublished on Friday, August 18, 2017
  • Chasing Shadows: Eclipses and Eclipse Observations in the Library of Congress Collections
    This post was authored by Sean Bryant, Science Reference & Research Specialist in the Science, Technology, and Business Division of the Library of Congress. He recently authored the blog posts “The Last Man on the Moon? — The Story of Eugene Cernan in Two Parts” and “An American in Orbit: The Story of John Glenn.” A partial solar eclipse, seen from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory satellite in 2014. (NASA) https://www.nasa.gov/content/solar-dynamics-observatory-sees-lunar-transit In a matter of days, the Moon will slip between the Earth and Sun. This has been happening every month or so, for more than four billion years, as the Moon orbits the Earth. If you imagine a line connecting the center of the Earth and the Sun, the Moon usually passes a bit ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Inside Adams BlogPublished on Friday, August 18, 2017
  • How Did Stephen King to the Dark Tower Come? Through Robert Browning’s “Childe Roland.”
    Robert Browning [between 1880 and 1910]Stephen King’s The Dark Tower series, adapted and released as a feature film earlier this month, is the latest in a long line of fantasy fiction to receive the big screen treatment.  While, like many works in its genre, The Dark Tower was partly influenced by J.R.R. Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings series, the work that inspired the original idea for the series is one that may be lesser-known to readers today—English poet Robert Browning’s “Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came.” Browning’s 34-stanza narrative poem takes its title from part of a song by Edgar in Shakespeare’s King Lear (Act III, Scene 4). In the poem, the narrator, presumably Childe Roland himself (a “childe” is an untested knight), approaches ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – From the Catbird Seat: Poetry and Literature BlogPublished on Friday, August 18, 2017
  • Total Eclipse in the Music Division!
    I have had August 21 circled on my calendar since I first heard about the 2017 total solar eclipse. And when I get pumped about anything pop culture, what do I do? I delve into the Music Division’s collections for related collection material, of course! “Total Eclipse” by E. Mack. Philadelphia: Lee & Walker, 1869. Call number M30.T. Music Division, Library of Congress. Let’s start with a piece of total eclipse history. On August 7, 1869, North America saw another total solar eclipse, one that the Philadelphia publisher Lee & Walker decided to commemorate when publishing E. Mack’s “Total Eclipse,” a set of four piano works named after the event: Total Eclipse Waltz, Total Eclipse Galop, Total Eclipse Mazurka, and Total Eclipse Polka. (The complete ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – In the Muse BlogPublished on Friday, August 18, 2017
  • Announcing the 2017-2018 Season of Concerts from the Library of Congress
    NEWS from the LIBRARY of CONGRESS Press Contact: Bryonna Head (202)707-3073, bhea@loc.govPublic Contact: Anne McLean (202) 707-8432 Website: Full Calendar ListingRequest ADA accommodations five business days in advance at (202) 707-6362 or ADA@loc.gov. Library of Congress Announces 2017-2018 Concert Season Series features world premieres of new commissions by Harrison Birtwistle, Rebecca Saunders and Esperanza Spalding, “Leonard Bernstein’s America” Centennial Celebration The Library of Congress kicks off its 2017-2018 concert season with a terrific pair of back-to-back concerts. On October 18, the contemporary music super-group Ensemble Signal performs works by pioneering minimalist composer Steve Reich in a concert presented in collaboration with Washington Performing Arts. Hailing from the vibrant Los Angeles music scene, the Grammy® Award-winning band La Santa Cecilia on October 19 brings to ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – In the Muse BlogPublished on Wednesday, August 16, 2017
  • A Literary Gem: The History and Future of the Archive of Hispanic Literature on Tape
    The following is a post by Amalia Castaneda, 2017 Library of Congress Junior Fellow, Hispanic Division. It originally appeared on the 4 Corners of the World blog. This summer, as a Junior Fellow in the Hispanic Division at the Library of Congress, I worked on the Archive of Hispanic Literature on Tape under the direction of Catalina Gómez, Hispanic Division Reference Librarian, who co-curates the Archive and has been instrumental in making these rich resources available via a digital platform. In preparation for my Junior Fellows’ display project, I had a chance to do what I love most about working with special collections: sift through boxes of materials, photographs, and manuscripts. When I came across an extraordinary collection of photographs and piles of correspondence—including a ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – From the Catbird Seat: Poetry and Literature BlogPublished on Wednesday, August 16, 2017
  • Looking to the Sky: Solar Eclipse 2017
    “Thousands of residents stood with necks craned and peered wide-eyed through smudged glass as the moon sped between the sun and earth, gradually shutting off the bright morning light. From President Coolidge to the urchins with bundles of papers under their arms, the city marvelled at the awesome but magnificent sight.”  - The Washington Post, Jan. 25, 1925. If you take away the obvious differences (Coolidge is President, paperboys on the streets), I imagine a similar scene taking place during our upcoming solar eclipse on August 21. As in 1925, Washington, D.C. is outside the “path of totality” but will still be able to witness a partial eclipse, with the moon covering about 80% of the sun. (In 1925, it was 95% covered.)  I expect many ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Picture the BlogPublished on Wednesday, August 16, 2017
  • A Range of Ranges
    When I was writing the posts about the Capitol dome, I wrote one about the firm of Janes, Fowler, & Kirtland Co. and in the post I included an image of one of the stoves they manufactured.  At the time, I was pretty confident that I wouldn’t be doing much more research on cast iron stoves. I was wrong. Old fashioned coal stoves. ca 1830-1900. https://www.loc.gov/item/2001701463 Recently, while doing some research on a particular stove, the colorful cover image from a 1917 catalog for Excelsior Stove & Manufacturing Company caught my eye. Excelsior Stove & Manufacturing Company, 1917 catalog https://lccn.loc.gov/97137812 As you would expect from a catalog, it features images and specifications of the numerous models they sold as well as helpful corporate and shipping ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Inside Adams BlogPublished on Tuesday, August 15, 2017
  • A Musical Artifact Rediscovered for Nagrin and Starer’s Indeterminate Figure
    Last week we featured a guest post from summer Fellow Rachel McNellis who shared discoveries from her work with the Daniel Nagrin Collection. This week she links an unidentified score titled “Vanity” to one of Nagrin’s seminal dance works, Indeterminate Figure.   Daniel Nagrin, a renowned modern dancer with a humanist worldview, included this brief quote in the performance programs for Indeterminate Figure (1957): Our Vanities seduce us into “ideal” images of what to be and do with our floundering selves, but realities constantly come crashing through. The human being has the amazing ability to select which reality he thinks important and to ignore what might destroy his world of illusion. The Wounds, whether heard or ignored, are real—too real. The music represents the frail ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – In the Muse BlogPublished on Friday, August 11, 2017
  • Free August 29 Webinar: “Books Go to War: Armed Services Editions in World War II”
    Armed Services Edition of The Great Gatsby. Rare Book and Special Collections Division When the United States entered World War II in 1941, it opposed nations that had banned and burned books. In 1943, the Council on Books in Wartime, working with the War Department, began distributing pocket-size paperback volumes to soldiers in every theater of war. By 1947, approximately 123 million copies of some 1,300 titles in every genre had been printed and distributed as Armed Services Editions. The program rescued from obscurity such now-classic books as F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby (1925), while Betty Smith’s A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (1943) became a national favorite. These books laid the groundwork for broad popularity of mass market paperbacks in post-WWII America. Today, they ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – From the Catbird Seat: Poetry and Literature BlogPublished on Thursday, August 10, 2017

 Library of Congress, LOC – Blogs 03

  • The Book Festival is Coming, See What’s in Store!
    We are officially just 15 days away from the 17th annual Library of Congress National Book Festival and we can hardly contain our excitement! Doors to the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C. will open at 8:30 a.m. on Saturday, Sept. 2. kicking off a day full of presentations, panels, poetry, family-friendly activities, characters, games, giveaways and more, all in celebration of books and reading. More than 100 celebrated authors will present from ten different stages including Main Stage, Contemporary Life, Fiction, Graphic Novels, History & Biography, Poetry & Prose, Teens, Thrillers & Fantasy and two separate Children’s stages for a day full of fun that you won’t want to miss. Don’t just take my word for it; check out our new video ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – National Book Festival BlogPublished on Friday, August 18, 2017
  • 4 Corners: International Collections Program Calendar, 8/18/2017
    Friday, September 1, 2017, noon – 2 p.m.The 21st Annual Vardanants Day Armenian Lecture“Echoes of Anatolia: An Armenian-American Novelist Discovers His Literary DNA at Mid-Life” The Near East Section of the African and Middle Eastern Division, the Library of Congress invites you to the 21st Annual Vardanants Day Armenian Lecture, featuring Chris Bohjalian, Best Selling Author, on “Echoes of Anatolia: An Armenian-American Novelist Discovers His Literary DNA at Mid-Life.” Free and open to the public. Allow time to clear security. Location: The Northeast Pavilion. Enter through the African and Middle Eastern Division Reading Room, LJ-220, 2nd floor, Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First Street SE, Washington, DC 20540. Metro stop: Capitol South. Contact: Levon Avdoyan, lavd@loc.gov, (202) 707-5680 Request ADA accommodations five business days in advance ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Four Corners of the WorldPublished on Friday, August 18, 2017
  • Drawing Digital Connections: Alan Lomax’s Spanish Journey
    Alan Lomax’s field notes mentioning Manuel García Matos among his contacts. Alan Lomax Collection, Manuscripts, 1952-53. loc.gov/resource/afc2004004.ms030215/?sp=24 The following is a guest post by Ascensión Mazuela-Anguita, who is based at the Spanish National Research Council in Barcelona and currently in residence at The John W. Kluge Center as the Alan Lomax Fellow in Folklife Studies. The Alan Lomax Collection at the Library of Congress includes, among other materials, recordings, photographs, diaries, notebooks and letters documenting Alan Lomax’s trip across Spain between June 1952 and January 1953. The main purpose of my project as a Lomax Postdoctoral Fellow at the John W. Kluge Center is to analyze these materials documenting Alan Lomax’s journey in order to establish connections between the songs recorded by Lomax in Spain and a ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Insights: Scholarly Work at The John W. Kluge CenterPublished on Thursday, August 17, 2017
  • Places in Civil War History: Aerial Reconnaissance and Map Marketing
    This is part of a series of guest posts from Ed Redmond, Cartographic Specialist in the Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division, documenting the cartographic history of maps related to the American Civil War, 1861-1865. The posts will appear on a regular basis. Aerial reconnaissance was first used in 1861 by the War Department using balloons tethered to the ground. Early balloon observers were civilian employees of the Army, sometimes referred to as “Aeronauts,” who ascended in baskets attached to the balloons to survey battlefields, make troop observations, and prepare maps based on those observations. The following is a report from Union Aeronaut John La Mountaine forwarded to General Benjamin F. Butler concerning two balloon ascensions made near Hampton Roads, Virginia: I have ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Worlds Revealed: Geography & Maps at the Library of Congress BlogPublished on Wednesday, August 16, 2017
  • A Literary Gem: The History and Future of the Archive of Hispanic Literature on Tape
    (The following is a post by Amalia Castaneda, 2017 Library of Congress Junior Fellow, Hispanic Division.) This summer, as a Junior Fellow in the Hispanic Division at the Library of Congress, I worked on the Archive of Hispanic Literature on Tape under the direction of Catalina Gómez, Hispanic Division Reference Librarian, who co-curates the Archive and has been instrumental in making these rich resources available via a digital platform. In preparation for my Junior Fellows’ display project, I had a chance to do what I love most about working with special collections: sift through boxes of materials, photographs, and manuscripts. When I came across an extraordinary collection of photographs and piles of correspondence — including a letter signed by Mexican writer, Octavio Paz, and Spanish ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Four Corners of the WorldPublished on Wednesday, August 16, 2017
  • Thomas Jefferson and the 1811 Constitution Day Eclipse
    This post is by Lee Ann Potter, the Director of Educational Outreach at the Library of Congress. As Americans anxiously await next week’s total eclipse of the sun, many are making plans not only to observe it, but also to record their observations in order to calculate their longitude. Or maybe not…But in 1811, when the solar eclipse that occurred on Constitution Day was visible in central Virginia, that is exactly what Thomas Jefferson did. Thomas Jefferson, President of the United States, Rembrandt Peale, 1801 On September 17, he diligently recorded his observations in his weather journal. He noted the times when the moon first “contacted” the sun, when the annulus (ring shape) formed, when the annulus broke, and when the contact ended.  He also ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Library of Congress Teaching BlogPublished on Tuesday, August 15, 2017
  • The Seven Voyages of Sindbad the Sailor
    (The following is a post by Mary-Jane Deeb, Chief of the African and Middle Eastern Division.) Of all the tales of “The Arabian Nights,” or the “Thousand and One Nights” those of the seven voyages of Sindbad the Sailor are perhaps the most familiar to people around the world. There have been numerous films made about Sindbad. There are many animated cartoons on Sindbad’s travels: as early as 1936, Paramount Pictures released “Popeye the Sailor meets Sindbad the Sailor,” and as late as 2003, “Sinbad: Legend of the Seven Seas” was produced by Dreamworks Animation. There are also TV series, video games, comic books, and many other items that feature Sindbad. “Shahrayar unveiling Shahrazad.” “The thousand and one nights, commonly called, in England, The Arabian ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Four Corners of the WorldPublished on Monday, August 14, 2017
  • Top 5 Reasons to Join the Booklovers Circle
    The following is a guest post by Thomas Shaw, operations assistant in the Library’s Development Office. We are excited to announce a new opportunity for book lovers to support our beloved annual celebration of reading and literacy, the National Book Festival, while enhancing their own festival experience. Each year, the Library of Congress National Book Festival brings together tens of thousands of festivalgoers with more than 100 of their favorite authors for engaging conversation, book signings and family fun. Thanks to its many sponsors and supporters, the festival has always been free to the public. This is by design, as the Library strives to promote a culture of reading and literacy. This year, the Library offers festival fans and literacy supporters the limited opportunity to ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – National Book Festival BlogPublished on Thursday, August 10, 2017
  • Exploring African Law and Ancient Egypt
    The following is a guest post by Alexandre Loktionov, PhD candidate in the Department of Archaeology & Anthropology at the University of Cambridge and a 2016 AHRC Fellow at The John W. Kluge Center. I am an Egyptologist happily working as a fellow at the Kluge Center of the Library of Congress. To some, I recognize that this may sound insane: Ancient Egypt has never been a research specialization of the Library. To others, I recognize that this may sound disappointing: there is no chance to climb pyramids, discover tombs, or engage in any other similarly dramatic activity. However, above all I recognize the huge potential for academic cross-pollination unlocked as a result of my time here. My doctoral work at the University of Cambridge focuses ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Insights: Scholarly Work at The John W. Kluge CenterPublished on Thursday, August 10, 2017
  • From Colony to Independence: Mid-19th Century Maps of Liberia
    Last month, the West African nation of Liberia marked 170 years of independence. The country has a unique and complex history, with a pivotal era of its founding as a colony captured in maps. “Cover of pamphlet, Liberia, 1847-1893, showing flag of Liberia.” Publisher unknown, 1893. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. The Geography and Map Division preserves a collection of twenty maps of Liberia produced in the mid-19th century, covering several decades before and after independence (1830 to 1870). The maps were authored by the American Colonization Society, which played an important, yet controversial, role in the country’s history. The foundation for the modern day Republic of Liberia was, in part, borne out of a difficult political, social, and cultural question in the ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Worlds Revealed: Geography & Maps at the Library of Congress BlogPublished on Wednesday, August 9, 2017

 Library of Congress, LOC – Blogs 04

  • Updates from the Veterans History Project (VHP): Senate Intern Reflects on Summer Spent Participating with VHP – Dispatch August 15, 2017
    An intern in the office of Arkansas Senator John Boozman, who spent the summer interviewing veterans across the state for the Library of Congress Veterans History Project (VHP), recently wrote a guest blog post for “Folklife Today” to share the personal impact of her involvement with the Project. Victoria Anderson, an English and mass communication major at Ouachita Baptist University in Arkadelphia, AR, summed up her experience as “an honor and a blessing.” The article includes photographs of the author with Senator Boozman, his staff and several veterans, many of whom served during World War II.  Anderson said she is now inspired to write her senior thesis on VHP with an emphasis on World War II veterans. To read the full article, go to: http://blogs.loc.gov/folklife/2017/08/honored-and-blessed-my-summer-spent-with-arkansas-veterans/ ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Updates from the Veterans History Project (VHP)Published on Tuesday, August 15, 2017
  • What’s New in Science Reference: Venus-the Forgotten, Mysterious Planet, August 15 Lecture
    Lori S. Glaze, Chief of the Planetary Geology, Geophysics and Geochemistry Laboratory at NASA Goddard, will present a lecture on Earth's sister planet Venus.  Dr. Glaze is the the principal investigator for a proposed mission to Venus called DAVINCI (the Deep Atmosphere Venus Investigation of Noble gases, Chemistry and Imaging), and will take attendees on a tour of what we know about Venus, what mysteries we need to solve, and what future spacecraft and instrument technologies could help us answer our questions.  The lecture will be held on Tuesday, August 15, in the Library's Pickford Theater, third floor of the Madison Building, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.  Click here for more information. ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – What’s New in Science ReferencePublished on Thursday, August 10, 2017
  • Updates from the Veterans History Project (VHP): Home at Last: A Look at World War I Homecomings – Dispatch August 2, 2017
    A Library of Congress summer fellow working with Veterans History Project (VHP) World War I collections examined service members’ reactions to and challenges of leaving the battlefield and returning stateside to their loved ones. The fellow, Irene Lule, recently wrote a guest blog post for “Folklife Today,” which highlights several reunion moments, including some of the veterans’ frustration with the modes of transportation and communication of the day. Lule also reveals why she found these stories detailing the human experience of war emotionally complex. To read the full article, go to: http://blogs.loc.gov/folklife/2017/07/world-war-i-homecomings/?loclr=eavhp Visit “Folklife Today” at http://blogs.loc.gov/folklife/ and select “subscribe” under the banner to receive regular updates and announcements from the American Folklife Center and VHP on folklife topics and highlights of collections that include ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Updates from the Veterans History Project (VHP)Published on Wednesday, August 2, 2017
  • Updates from the Veterans History Project (VHP): Girl Crazy and Political: A Comparison of ‘Twenty-somethings’ Born a Century Apart- Dispatch July 24, 2017
    A Library of Congress Junior Fellow working with Veterans History Project (VHP) World War I collections compared the mind-sets of her generation with those who were in the same age range 100 years ago. Fellow and recent graduate Justina Moloney, today wrote a guest blog post for “Folklife Today,” which highlights some of her discoveries, including one veteran’s letters to multiple “girlfriends,” and another’s strong views on the United States as an international superpower. Millennials and baby boomers alike may find Moloney’s post intriguing. To read the full article, go to: http://blogs.loc.gov/folklife/2017/07/cest-la-guerre-thats-the-war/?loclr=eavhp Visit “Folklife Today” at http://blogs.loc.gov/folklife/ and select “subscribe” under the banner to receive regular updates and announcements from the American Folklife Center and VHP on folklife topics and highlights of collections that include ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Updates from the Veterans History Project (VHP)Published on Monday, July 24, 2017

 Library of Congress, LOC – For Librarians


 Library of Congress, LOC – For Teachers

  • Today in History – August 19
    On August 19, 1814, during the War of 1812, British troops under the command of Major General Robert Ross and Rear Admiral George Cockburn landed at Benedict, Maryland, on the shores of the Patuxent River. Continue reading. The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) first aired Saturday morning television shows for children on August 19, 1950. Continue reading. Click here to search Today in History for other historic moments. ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Today in HistoryPublished on Saturday, August 19, 2017
  • Today in History – August 18
    Explorer Meriwether Lewis, who joined William Clark to blaze a trail across the continent to the Pacific Ocean, was born on August 18, 1774, near Charlottesville, Virginia. Continue reading. Click here to search Today in History for other historic moments. ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Today in HistoryPublished on Friday, August 18, 2017
  • Today in History – August 17
    On August 17, 1790, the Hebrew Congregation of Newport, Rhode Island, presented a congratulatory address to President George Washington on the occasion of his visit to their city. Continue reading. Click here to search Today in History for other historic moments. ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Today in HistoryPublished on Thursday, August 17, 2017
  • Today in History – August 16
    On August 16, 1939, New York City’s Hippodrome Theater closed its doors for the last time. Built in 1905 with a seating capacity of 5,200, for a time the Hippodrome was the largest and most successful theater in New York. Continue reading. Click here to search Today in History for other historic moments. ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Today in HistoryPublished on Wednesday, August 16, 2017
  • Thomas Jefferson and the 1811 Constitution Day Eclipse
    This post is by Lee Ann Potter, the Director of Educational Outreach at the Library of Congress. As Americans anxiously await next week’s total eclipse of the sun, many are making plans not only to observe it, but also to record their observations in order to calculate their longitude. Or maybe not…But in 1811, when the solar eclipse that occurred on Constitution Day was visible in central Virginia, that is exactly what Thomas Jefferson did. Thomas Jefferson, President of the United States, Rembrandt Peale, 1801 On September 17, he diligently recorded his observations in his weather journal. He noted the times when the moon first “contacted” the sun, when the annulus (ring shape) formed, when the annulus broke, and when the contact ended.  He also ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Library of Congress Teaching BlogPublished on Tuesday, August 15, 2017
  • Today in History – August 15
    On August 15, 1790, John Carroll became the first bishop of the Roman Catholic Church in the United States. Continue reading. Florence Mabel Kling DeWolfe Harding, First Lady during the Warren G. Harding administration (1921-23), was born on August 15, 1860. Continue reading. Click here to search Today in History for other historic moments. ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Today in HistoryPublished on Tuesday, August 15, 2017
  • Today in History – August 14
    On August 14, 1848, Congress created the Oregon Territory, an area encompassing present-day Oregon, Idaho, Washington, and parts of western Montana and Wyoming. Continue reading. Click here to search Today in History for other historic moments. ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Today in HistoryPublished on Monday, August 14, 2017
  • Today in History – August 13
    On August 13, 1942, Soviet Premier Joseph Stalin drafted a memorandum to British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt opposing their decision not to invade Western Europe at that time. Continue reading. Click here to search Today in History for other historic moments. ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Today in HistoryPublished on Sunday, August 13, 2017
  • Today in History – August 12
    August 12, 1877, is the date popularly given for Thomas Alva Edison’s completion of the model for the first phonograph, a device that recorded sound onto tinfoil cylinders. Continue reading. Click here to search Today in History for other historic moments. ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Today in HistoryPublished on Saturday, August 12, 2017
  • Today in History – August 11
    During an Amateur Athletic Union (AAU) swim meet on August 11, 1911, Duke Paoa Kahinu Mokoe Hulikohola Kahanamoku broke the world record in the 100-yard freestyle swim by 4.6 seconds. Officials were so incredulous at his time that the AAU would not recognize his feat until many years later. Continue reading. On August 11, 1934, a group of federal prisoners arrived at Alcatraz Island, a twenty-two-acre rock outcropping one and a half miles offshore in San Francisco Bay. Continue reading. Click here to search Today in History for other historic moments. ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Today in HistoryPublished on Friday, August 11, 2017

 Library of Congress, LOC – For BPH, Blind and Physically Handicapped

  • Back to School: Method Books Edition (Part 1)
    Although for most of us it still feels like the middle of summer outside, it is time for many folks to begin thinking about back-to-school, and the new books and supplies for the year. That, of course, includes books for music classes, band, and orchestra. In the past, we’ve discussed books for college students, and some books for piano, voice and band students. However, we’ve never written in-depth about some of the method books we have available in the collection for band and orchestra students from elementary through high school. Below you will find a partial list of method books for wind instruments – there are many more that could not be listed here! As always, please contact us if you have any questions, or ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – National Library Services, NLS, Braille Audio Reading Download, BARD. Music Note Blog for BPH, Blind Physically HandicappedPublished on Thursday, August 17, 2017
  • A Gem in the Music Appreciation Collection
    One of the most nerve-racking events I ever experienced as a music student was participating in master classes. I remember one class in particular vividly; the feeling of slight panic as the master class teacher repeated for the fourth time, “no, not like that, try again.” I could hear the audience shifting in their seats uncomfortably. Remembering my experience, I cautiously chose several recordings of master classes to listen to in the NLS Music collection. The classes are given by the top-tier artists in the classical music world such as Maxim Vengerov (violin), András Schiff (piano), and Steven Isserlis (cello). I found these classes to be very inspiring, insightful, motivating and educational, a completely different experience than the master classes that I sweated through in ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – National Library Services, NLS, Braille Audio Reading Download, BARD. Music Note Blog for BPH, Blind Physically HandicappedPublished on Thursday, August 10, 2017
  • ¡Feliz Cumpleaños, Ernesto!
    August 6 is the birthday of Cuban composer Ernesto Lecuona, who lived from 1895 to 1963. While some composers’ names might stir a vague recollection of some concert I attended, Lecuona brings to mind an indelible childhood memory. It happened on a Monday afternoon when I was five or six years old. I was lying down for a nap. My mother had turned on one of those easy-listening stations, offering music as uneventful as that hot summer day, and so I rested for a while. Then they played a song that caught my attention. The music seemed to start in one place, move up to a different area, and then drop back to where it started: up, down, up, down, over and over. I was ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – National Library Services, NLS, Braille Audio Reading Download, BARD. Music Note Blog for BPH, Blind Physically HandicappedPublished on Thursday, August 3, 2017
  • A New Look for NLS Website
    This blog is a brief change from our regularly scheduled programming to bring you an update! We are proud to premier our brand new website: www.loc.gov/nls/ You may be saying, “New? But it’s the same web address as before!” That may be true, but the site has been completely re-designed so that it may be more useful to our patrons and to the public. The navigation on the left-side panel on the home page lists some of our most popular topics, including the currency reader project, braille courses, BARD, and of course music! Also please check out the catalog, where you can search for braille and digital talking books. If you haven’t already, please do check it out and let us know what you think! ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – National Library Services, NLS, Braille Audio Reading Download, BARD. Music Note Blog for BPH, Blind Physically HandicappedPublished on Friday, July 28, 2017
  • There’s No Song Like an Old Song
    I’m always reminding myself how fortunate I am to live in an area that offers not only great classical music, theater and dance performances, but many popular music performers make a stop, especially during the summer. Being a child of the sixties, rock and roll concerts usually meant performances in smoky nightclubs (missed out on those) like the Whiskey a Go Go or a larger venue, such as a multi-purpose use hall.  You can go to a rodeo, livestock fair, church convention and you can go see Elvis, The Carpenters or Paul Revere and the Raiders, as I did at the Taylor County Coliseum. Elvis was the King, let’s not forget that fact, thank you, thank you very much. But these venues started a trend ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – National Library Services, NLS, Braille Audio Reading Download, BARD. Music Note Blog for BPH, Blind Physically HandicappedPublished on Thursday, July 27, 2017

 Library of Congress, LOC – Law Library 01

  • Pioneering Women in Congress
    The following is a guest blog post by Christina Miskey and Allison Bailund, Law Library metadata interns, University of Washington MLIS students, and women’s history buffs. Today is the 97th anniversary of the 19th amendment to the United States Constitution guaranteeing women the right to vote. In honor of this culmination of the women’s suffrage movement and the first major blockbuster superhero movie featuring women as both the star and director, we have gathered a list of some of the pioneering female superheroes in Congress, along with references to a few collections in the Library of Congress related to women’s history. An artist’s rambles in Washington – No. 3: the Senate lobby and the floor of the House / from sketches by a staff ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – In Custodia Legis BlogPublished on Friday, August 18, 2017
  • Legal Research Reports: Israel: Law for the Regulation of Settlement in Judea and Samaria, 5777-2017
    The Law Library of Congress is proud to present the report, Israel: Law for the Regulation of Settlement in Judea and Samaria, 5777-2017.  On February 6, 2017, the Knesset (Israel’s Parliament) passed a law for the regulation of land in Judea and Samaria (the West Bank). Land subject to the regulation is defined as that on which Israeli settlements were built “in good faith” or “with the consent of the state.” The law provides for registration of land ownership under the name of the government official in charge where ownership has not otherwise been established. Additionally, it provides for the expropriation of the rights of use and possession of privately-owned land in the region. Such expropriation will be in effect until a political resolution on the ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Law Library Legal Research ReportsPublished on Thursday, August 17, 2017
  • Browse Law.gov Content by Topic or Jurisdiction
    A few years ago, Andrew mentioned the possibility of adding a page where users could browse by jurisdiction among our different content types.  Our content types include In Custodia Legis, the Guide to Law Online, the Global Legal Monitor, Legal Reports, and other content materials such as research guides. We are adding more content in the coming months including the historical U.S. Reports, Statutes at Large, U.S. Code, U.S. Treaties, and the Code of Federal Regulations. In order to help find subjects or jurisdictions when the content type doesn’t matter, you can still use the facets on our search page or now use our newly created browse page. Screenshot of Topics & Jurisdictions page, http://www.loc.gov/law/find/topics.php. The first category on this page is “Topics.” We have ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – In Custodia Legis BlogPublished on Thursday, August 17, 2017
  • Congress.gov Tip, Top, and New for August 2017
    I recently mentioned that we are doing releases for Congress.gov that are more frequent and smaller in scope.  Rather than posting highlights of just the new enhancements, I thought it would be good to share a little more from across Congress.gov including the featured search tip and the top 10 most-viewed bills. Search Tip Adrienne Keys drafts and regularly shares search tips (available via RSS or email).  The current featured tip is on Senate Communications Quick Search: A Senate Communications Quick Search option allows you to search according to the date – or range of dates – that executive communications (EC), presidential messages (PM), or petitions and memorials (POM) appeared in the Congressional Record. You can try this feature with a search for items that appeared in the ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – In Custodia Legis BlogPublished on Tuesday, August 15, 2017
  • “Would You Be Interested in Getting (Attorney General) William Wirt’s Head Back?” Rebecca Roberts Brings Us a Tale From the Congressional Cemetery
    This is a guest post by Rebecca Boggs Roberts. Rebecca is a program coordinator at Smithsonian Associates, writer, and the former program director for the Historic Congressional Cemetery. In 2003, an unidentified man called the Historic Congressional Cemetery in Washington, D.C. and asked the cemetery manager, “Would you be interested in getting William Wirt’s head back?” The answer, of course, was yes, but the mysterious caller hung up without providing more details. Hardly a household name now, William Wirt was prominent in his day.  Born into a relatively prosperous Maryland family in 1772, Wirt was orphaned as a boy. With the help of some generous patrons, Wirt received a classical education, read for and was admitted to the Virginia Bar. He led a distinguished legal career and eventually served ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – In Custodia Legis BlogPublished on Monday, August 14, 2017
  • Kudzu, Invasive Species and the Law
    Last weekend I was pulling English ivy off the corner of my house where it had grown over from the neighbor’s yard, and I reflected on the large number of invasive plants I see growing all over the national capital area: kudzu, porcelain berry, water hyacinth, callery pear, and tree of heaven.  I wondered what the law has done to help with this “ecological plague”. Kudzu is a prime example of this problem; it’s also known as “the vine that ate the South” for its rapid-fire, ubiquitous spread across the southeastern United States.  Kudzu (Pueraria montana var. lobata) is a legume, originally from Japan. The Soil Conservation Service encouraged Southern farmers to plant it in the 1930s and 1940s as a cover crop to add ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – In Custodia Legis BlogPublished on Friday, August 11, 2017
  • Naming Laws in Germany
    In April 2017, the Association for the German Language (Gesellschaft für deutsche Sprache (GfdS)) published its annual list of the most popular baby names of the last year. The GfdS has been publishing this list since 1977. Since 2004, it has been included in the Statistical Yearbook of Germany by the German Statistical Office (Destatis), thereby making it the semi-official German list, as the German government does not publish its own list. In honor of the 70th anniversary of the GfdS, this year’s list included  70 names total instead of the usual ten names per gender. In addition, the GfdS also published a list of the Top-5 all-time favorite first names since the list started 40 years ago. The All-Time Top-5 for Girls: The All-Time Top-5 for ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – In Custodia Legis BlogPublished on Thursday, August 10, 2017
  • Legal Research Reports: Refugee Law and Policy
    The Law Library of Congress is proud to present the report, Refugee Law and PolicyThis report describes the law and policy on refugees and other asylum seekers in 22 geographically dispersed countries and, at the supranational level, in the European Union. The individual surveys cover such topics as participation in relevant international conventions; laws and regulations governing the admission of refugees and handling refugee claims; processes for handling refugees arriving at the border; procedures for evaluating whether an applicant is entitled to refugee status; the accommodations and assistance provided to refugees in the jurisdiction; requirements for naturalization; and whether asylum policy has been affected by international emergencies, such as the current refugee crisis in Europe. More information on this report is available in an In Custodia ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Law Library Legal Research ReportsPublished on Thursday, August 10, 2017
  • The Queen’s Speech 2017
    This is a guest post by Conleth Burns, foreign law intern, who wrote a another post earlier this summer, UK Supreme Court rules “Deport first, appeal later” power is unlawful. State Opening. The Lord Chancellor hands the speech to the Queen. The Queen’s Speech is written by the government and is central to the State Opening ceremony because it sets out the government’s legislative agenda. Photograph by Roger Harris. Reproduced by permission of Parliament On June 21st 2017, HM Queen Elizabeth II formally opened the UK’s Parliament by delivering her 64th Queen’s Speech. Despite being called the “Queen’s Speech,” this speech is not written by the Queen herself but the UK government ministers. As head of state, it is the Queen’s constitutional duty to remain strictly ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – In Custodia Legis BlogPublished on Wednesday, August 9, 2017
  • Regulating the Rag and Bone Man
    This is a guest post by Clare Feikert, foreign law specialist for the United Kingdom at the Law Library of Congress. “Instinctively he and we knew then that what we had not use for was nonetheless of worth”, Environment Committee, Second report, Recycling, 1993-94, HC 63-i, at 14. The “rag and bone man,” also known as the bone-grubber, bone-picker, rag-gatherer, bag board, and totter, has been in existence in England since the Middle Ages; he would lead a horse and wagon around villages calling out for rags and bones.  The trade was a precursor for modern-day recycling by collecting unwanted items and selling them for reuse; it was immortalized in the British sitcom Steptoe and Son, which was later remade in the U.S. as Sanford and ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – In Custodia Legis BlogPublished on Tuesday, August 8, 2017

 Library of Congress, LOC – Law Library 02

  • Qatar: Anti-Terror Legislation Amended
    (Aug. 16, 2017) On July 20, 2017, the Amir of Qatar issued Decree No. 4 of 2017 to amend Law No. 11 of 2004 on combating terrorism. Decree No. 4 of 2017 covers the definition of acts of terrorism.  (Qatar Amir Issues Decree to Amend Provisions of Anti-Terror Law, AL ARABIYA (July 20, 2017).) Specifically, article 1 of the newly enacted legislation modifies article 333 of Law No. 11 of 2004 on the definition of acts of terrorism. The new article stipulates, “[a]nyone other than those authorized by law who violates the inviolability of the private life of individuals without their consent shall be punished by imprisonment for a period not exceeding two years and by a fine not exceeding 10,000 riyals [about US$2,695].” Under ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Law Library Global Legal MonitorPublished on Wednesday, August 16, 2017
  • Afghanistan: Cyber Crime Code Signed into Law
    (Aug. 16, 2017) On June 20, 2017, Afghanistan President Mohammad Ashraf Ghani signed into law the Cyber Crime Code, which forms part of the country’s new Penal Code. (Walasmashar Da Internete Jarmono Qanon Tawshih Karry [President Signed the Law of Cybercrimes], PAJHWAK Pashto (June 20, 2017).)  The Penal Code is being drafted by the Law Enforcement and Academic-Legal Research Institute of the Ministry of Justice. (Copy of formal letter from the Institute to the Ministry of Communications and Information Technology [MCIT] (Jawza 24, 1396 [June 14, 2017], received by author from MCIT spokesperson Najeeb Nangial.) There are 11 different codes and 63 miscellaneous provisions on crime that will be merged into the Penal Code. An advisor to the Ministry of Justice, Mohammad Ashraf Rasoli, says “the new ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Law Library Global Legal MonitorPublished on Wednesday, August 16, 2017
  • Italy: Early Retirement Benefits
    (Aug. 15, 2017) On June 17, 2017, new legislation on early retirement, which is an option for certain qualifying employees participating in the Italian public pension system, entered into effect in Italy. (Decree of the President of the Council of Ministers, No. 87 of May 23, 2017, on Regulations Implementing Article 1, Paragraphs 199 to 205, of Law No. 232 of December 11, 2016, on Reduction of the Contribution Requirement for Access to Early Retirement for Workers, “Earlies” (Decree No. 87), GAZZETTA UFFICIALE (G.U.) (June 16, 2017)  (in Italian).) Purpose of the Legislation The new legislation implements new rules on the contribution requirement for access to early retirement. (Decree No. 87, art. 1(1).)  Effective May 1, 2017, the law reduces the contribution period to 41 years for ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Law Library Global Legal MonitorPublished on Tuesday, August 15, 2017
  • Portugal: New Law Further Regulates Surrogate Pregnancy
    (Aug. 14, 2017) On July 31, 2017, the Government of Portugal enacted Regulatory Decree No. 6 to further regulate surrogate pregnancy (gestação de substituição), which is governed by Law No. 32 of 2006.  (Decreto Regulamentar No. 6/2017, de 31 de Julho (Regulatory Decree No. 6), DIÁRIO DA REPÚBLICA ELETRÓNIO; Lei No. 32/2006, de 26 de Julho (Surrogacy Law), Procuradoria-Geral Distrital de Lisboa website.) Surrogate Pregnancy Under the Surrogacy Law The Surrogacy Law defines surrogate pregnancy as any situation in which a woman is prepared to bear a pregnancy on behalf of another person and to surrender the child after birth by renouncing maternal rights and duties. (Surrogacy Law, art. 8(1).) The Law also establishes that the business relationship of surrogate pregnancy is only possible in exceptional cases and ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Law Library Global Legal MonitorPublished on Monday, August 14, 2017
  • Finland: Parliament Passes New Postal Act to Reduce Service
    (Aug. 14, 2017) On June 8 and June 21, 2017, the Finnish Parliament, in both a first round and second round of voting, approved amendments to the country’s Postal Act, allowing for distribution of letters and packages to be limited to three days a week in larger cities. (Innehållet i postlagen godkänt, RIKSDAGEN (June 8, 2017).) Smaller towns are still to receive postal service five days a week. (Id.) The distinction in level of required service depends on whether the community enjoys morning newspaper service, i.e., if the residential home will continue to be able to receive a morning paper even if the postal service is limited to three days a week. In larger Finnish cities, morning paper delivery services are provided separately by the newspaper ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Law Library Global Legal MonitorPublished on Monday, August 14, 2017
  • Netherlands: Draft Law on New International Commercial Court
    (Aug. 11, 2017) On July 18, 2017, Stef Blok, Minister of Security and Justice of the Netherlands, submitted draft legislation to the Dutch House of Representatives (Tweede Kamer) on the establishment of a new commercial court that would have the authority to render judgments in English on complex international trade disputes involving the Netherlands. (Legislative Proposal on Netherlands Commercial Court Submitted to Dutch House of Representatives, Ministry of Security and Justice website (July 18, 2017).) According to the Ministry of Security and Justice, “[t]here is an increasing need in the Netherlands for dispute resolution in English,” given the wide use of English “in international trade and drawing up contracts, as well as in correspondence between legal, fiscal and commercial advisers and their internationally operating clients.” ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Law Library Global Legal MonitorPublished on Friday, August 11, 2017
  • Netherlands: Harsher Punishments for Serious Traffic Offenses
    (Aug. 11, 2017) On July 20, 2017, the Minister of Security and Justice (MSJ) of the Netherlands, Stef Blok, submitted a policy brief to the Dutch House of Representatives (Tweede Kamer) as the basis for legislation to increase the maximum penalty for serious traffic-related offenses under the Road Traffic Act. (Minister Blok gaat strafmaat ernstige verkeersdelicten verhogen [Minister Blok Is Going to Punish Serious Traffic Crimes] (July 20, 2017); Onderzoek “ernstige verkeersdelicten” [Research on “Serious Traffic Crimes”], Tweede Kamer [House of Representatives] website (click on Beleidsreactie onderzoek ‘Straftoemeting ernstige verkeersdelicten’ [Policy Response to Research on ‘Punishment of Serious Traffic Crimes’] to view Blok’s letter; click on Download het kamerstuk [Download This Chamber] to view the lengthy research paper) (last visited Aug. 9, 2017); Wegenverkeerswet 1994 [Road Traffic ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Law Library Global Legal MonitorPublished on Friday, August 11, 2017
  • Mali: Referendum on Constitutional Amendments Postponed
    (Aug. 10, 2017) On June 2, 2017, the National Assembly of Mali approved a bill to amend the 1992 Constitution, as President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita earlier this year had announced would occur. (Antoine Le Goff, Mali: les enjeux d’une révision constitutionnelle qui suscite l’opposition [Mali: The Constitutional Amendments’ Issues Awakens the Opposition], LE MONDE (June 16, 2017).) The government had also announced that a referendum on the issue would take place on July 9, but on June 21 the Council of Ministers decided to delay the referendum to an unspecified later date. (Mali/Constitution: report sine die du referendum [Mali/Constitution: Referendum Postponed Indefinitely], AFRICA NEWS (June 22, 2017).) The government presented the constitutional amendments as necessary to give effect to a 2015 peace accord, the Algiers Accords, ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Law Library Global Legal MonitorPublished on Thursday, August 10, 2017
  • Peru: Judicial Determination of Out-of-Wedlock Paternity
    (Aug. 10, 2017) The Peruvian Congress, by a unanimous vote, has amended the law governing the process for establishing filiation of children. Under the amendment, Law 30628, anyone with a legitimate interest in obtaining a paternity determination may file a petition before a Justice of the Peace in order to obtain such a determination. (Ley que Regula el Proceso de Filiación Judicial de la Paternidad Extramatrimonial [Law Regulating the Process of Judicial Filiation of Extramarital Paternity], Law No. 28457, EL PERUANO [EP, Peru’s official gazette] (Jan. 8, 2005); Ley que Modifica el Proceso de Filiación Judicial de Paternidad Extramatrimonial, Law No. 30628, EP (Aug. 3, 2017).) The amendment also prescribes that an alimony claim may be joined together with a paternity claim as an accessory claim before the ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Law Library Global Legal MonitorPublished on Thursday, August 10, 2017
  • China: Banks Ordered to Report Overseas Transactions of Chinese Bank Cards
    (Aug. 10, 2017) In June 2017, China’s foreign exchange regulator, the State Administration of Foreign Exchange (SAFE), ordered banks in China to collect information, on a daily basis, of overseas transactions made on Chinese bank cards. Starting September 1, 2017, any overseas cash withdrawal or single purchase made with an amount of more than RMB1,000 (about US$150) through a debit or credit card issued by a Chinese bank must be reported to the SAFE.  (Guojia Waihui Guanli Ju Guanyu Jinrong Jigou Baosong Yinhangka Jingwai Jiaoyi Xinxi de Tongzhi [SAFE Circular on Financial Institutions’ Reporting of Information of Overseas Transactions Made Through Bank Cards] (SAFE Circular) (June 2, 2017), SAFE website.) According to the SAFE Circular, banks must submit information about all overseas transactions made within ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Law Library Global Legal MonitorPublished on Thursday, August 10, 2017

 Library of Congress, LOC – Law Library 03

  • H.R.339
    Northern Mariana Islands Economic Expansion Act (08/11/2017 legislative day) ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Law Library Congress.gov House Floor TodayPublished on Friday, August 11, 2017
  • H.R.2288
    Veterans Appeals Improvement and Modernization Act of 2017 (08/11/2017 legislative day) ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Law Library Congress.gov House Floor TodayPublished on Friday, August 11, 2017
  • H.J.Res.76
    Granting the consent and approval of Congress for the Commonwealth of Virginia, the State of Maryland, and the District of Columbia to enter into a compact relating to the establishment of the Washington Metrorail Safety Commission. (08/04/2017 legislative day) ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Law Library Congress.gov House Floor TodayPublished on Friday, August 4, 2017
  • H.J.Res.76
    Granting the consent and approval of Congress for the Commonwealth of Virginia, the State of Maryland, and the District of Columbia to enter into a compact relating to the establishment of the Washington Metrorail Safety Commission. (08/04/2017 legislative day) ... read more
    Source: Congress.gov Senate Floor TodayPublished on Friday, August 4, 2017
  • S.371
    Department of State Authorities Act, Fiscal Year 2017, Improvements Act (07/28/2017 legislative day) ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Law Library Congress.gov House Floor TodayPublished on Friday, July 28, 2017
  • H.R.873
    Global War on Terrorism War Memorial Act (07/28/2017 legislative day) ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Law Library Congress.gov House Floor TodayPublished on Friday, July 28, 2017
  • H.R.3180
    Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (07/28/2017 legislative day) ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Law Library Congress.gov House Floor TodayPublished on Friday, July 28, 2017
  • H.Res.480
    Providing for consideration of the bill (S. 114) to amend title 38, United States Code, to require the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to submit an annual report regarding performance awards and bonuses awarded to certain high-level employees of the Department of Veterans Affairs. (07/28/2017 legislative day) ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Law Library Congress.gov House Floor TodayPublished on Friday, July 28, 2017
  • S.114
    Department of Veterans Affairs Bonus Transparency Act (07/28/2017 legislative day) ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Law Library Congress.gov House Floor TodayPublished on Friday, July 28, 2017
  • H.Res.481
    Providing for consideration of the bill (H.R. 3180) to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2018 for intelligence and intelligence-related activities of the United States Government, the Community Management Account, and the Central Intelligence Agency Retirement and Disability System, and for other purposes; waiving a requirement of clause 6(a) of rule XIII with respect to consideration of certain resolutions reported from the Committee on Rules; and providing for proceedings during the period from July 31, 2017, through September 4, 2017. (07/28/2017 legislative day) ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Law Library Congress.gov House Floor TodayPublished on Friday, July 28, 2017

 Library of Congress, LOC – Copyright

  • U.S. Copyright Office, NewsNet Issue 676
     NewsNet Issue 676August 18, 2017 Copyright Office Submits Proposed Fee Schedule and Analysis to Congress Today, the U.S. Copyright Office submitted to Congress a schedule and analysis of a proposed fee for recording certain types of documents with the Office.  Specifically, the Office proposes to establish a separate, lower fee for documents submitted for recordation that are accompanied by an electronic title list; i.e., a list of certain indexing information about the copyrighted works to which such documents pertain.  These lists save Office staff from needing to find and input this often voluminous information manually.  The Office anticipates that a lower fee will incentivize more remitters to use these electronic lists, which should help the Office to improve its processing efficiency.  The Office also ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – What’s New at the Copyright OfficePublished on Friday, August 18, 2017
  • U.S. Copyright Office, NewsNet Issue 675
     NewsNet Issue 675August 16, 2017 Copyright Office Proposes Rule to Simplify Deposit Requirements for Certain Literary Works and Musical Compositions The United States Copyright Office is proposing to amend the regulations governing the deposit requirements for certain types of published literary works and musical compositions to require the deposit of a single copy rather than two copies. The proposed rule will apply to certain literary monographs (as defined in the rule) and musical compositions published in print formats. Additionally, the proposed rule clarifies the deposit requirements for musical compositions published both in print and phonorecord formats to require the submission of the print version for purposes of copyright registration. These changes will improve the efficiency of registration and mandatory deposit for both the Office ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – What’s New at the Copyright OfficePublished on Wednesday, August 16, 2017
  • Copyright Legislative Developments
    CLASSICS Act H.R.3301, CLASSICS Act, introduced July 19, 2017.  Click here for more information. ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Copyright Legislative DevelopmentsPublished on Friday, July 28, 2017
  • Copyright eService Maintenance & Updates
    The eCO Registration System will be offline at 6:00PM ET due to Pay.gov maintenance on Saturday, July 29.  This outage will be followed by the weekly eCO maintenance window of 10:00PM Saturday to 6:00AM Sunday (Eastern Time). We thank you for your patience and we apologize for any inconvenience.   ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Copyright eService Maintenance and UpdatesPublished on Wednesday, July 26, 2017
  • Copyright Royalty Board News, Issue 171
    July 26, 2017Issue 171 COPYRIGHT ROYALTY JUDGES ANNOUNCE RECEIPT OF NOTICE OF INTENT TO AUDIT MUSIC CHOICE’S PREEXISTING SUBSCRIPTION SERVICE AND BUSINESS ESTABLISHMENT SERVICE FOR 2016 (82 FR 34554) The Copyright Royalty Judges have received notice of intent to audit the 2016 statements of account submitted by Music Choice concerning the royalty payments its Preexisting Subscription Service and Business Establishments Service made pursuant to two statutory licenses. For details, click here. For an accessible version, click here. ********************************************************* *CALENDAR* July 26, 2017:  Due date for reply comments on proposed new rule authorizing judges to bar certain individuals and entities from participating in proceedings before the judges (82 FR 28800). ********************************************************* To password-protect your list of subscriptions, change your email address or delivery preference, ... read more
    Source: News Feed – US Library of Congress, LOC (PD USPD) – Copyright Royalty Review BoardsPublished on Wednesday, July 26, 2017